Thank god it’s Frida

Thank god it’s Frida

(Source: magictransistor, via theleathernomad)

Alright, Portland, let’s do this thing again.

The first time I lived in PDX, it was 2001, and I worked my fool head off cocktailing at Pazzo and Veritable Quandary and made adequate websites for little businesses. I lived in the tiniest apartment on Hawthorne with no furniture except for Gabe’s fancy table and chairs, but I lived above the boiler room, so the floor was always warm. Plus! It had been the building manager’s office, so the laundry folks left a bag of quarters in the mail slot every week. It was like living in a diorama: a shoebox from which to peek out at the rain.

Jimmy would take me to the movies, or for a ride around the neighborhood on the handlebars of his bike. We’d go hiking somewhere impossibly green.

The chef I was almost-dating would acquire me a lot of fancy cheese, which I’d often trade for a slice of pizza to the bartender I was almost-dating. The joys of being in one’s baby-20s.

I listened to a lot of Jeff Buckley. I learned a lot about writing from a salty old Armenian. “You’re in love with him, aren’t you? It’s terrible, isn’t it?”

The second time I lived in PDX, it was 2010, and I moved there from New Orleans to work for Wieden+Kennedy. B and I lived in a schmancy apartment in the Pearl with a view straight across the city and into my dentist’s office. I had things like a dentist. I could afford to buy my own cheese, but I still listened to a lot of Jeff Buckley. I went to London. I went to wine tastings. I met amazing, smarty smart people who I am looking forward to giving a big neck hug to.

It was an entirely different city, except for the weather, which has always made me skeptical at best. 

Now I’m moving back again. Portland. You are the furthest thing away from my hometown I can think of, culturally and geographically, while still being a place I love. You quirky thing, you’ve always been nice to me when I’ve been down.

image

Be sweet to me again, won’t you?

Tags: PDX

(via The Essential Guide to Summer Fruit - The Awl)
Stay the darkness.

Stay the darkness.

(Source: sillyenfp)

(Source: explodingdog)

luckypeach:

For our All You Can Eat issue, our Southeastern Pennsylvania correspondent Mark Ibold took on the buffets of Amish Country—and brought home this recipe.
Chicken Pot Pie
Makes 4 to 6 servings
Chicken Pot Pie is a staple of Pennsylvanian Dutch cooking and a fixture at Amish Country buffets. What we call chicken pot pie in central PA is more like a thick chicken noodle stew, a relative of what they call chicken and dumplings in Edna Lewis’s part of the country. 
1 chicken, 3 to 4 pounds2 to 3 Q chicken broth (store-bought is fine)1 large pinch saffron (like 20 strands)1 C flour2 t baking powder1 t salt (more as needed to season)1 T butter1 egg½ eggshell full of cold water1 small white onion, halved and thinly sliced1 largish Russet potato, peeled, halved lengthwise, and thinly sliced+ fresh ground black pepper
1. Cut up the chicken in pieces, nestle them into a cozy pot, and cover with broth by about an inch. Sprinkle in the saffron, cover with a lid, and bring to a simmer over high heat. Once it has simmered, turn the heat down as low as it’ll go and let the chicken poach for 25 minutes. Then turn the heat off, leave the lid on, and let the pot sit until the chicken is cool enough to handle. 
2. While the chicken is cooling, make the noodles: sift together the flour, baking powder, and salt. Cut in the butter, then work in the eggs and water. As soon as the dough comes together, roll it thin and cut it into 2” by 2” noodles. (I like to make rippled noodles; if you’ve got a wavy-edged rolling cutter, do so.)
3. Move the chicken from the pot to a bowl and bring the broth to a boil over high heat. Add noodles, a handful at a time, stirring well after each addition. The noodles will puff up in a minute or two (and eventually disintegrate to a degree, which is perfectly fine.) Add the onion and potato, stir, and once the broth returns to a boil, reduce the heat to a simmer. Cook until the potatoes are soft and almost breaking up. 
4. While the potatoes are simmering, shred the chicken by hand, and season the meat amply with salt and lots of black pepper. Add it to the pot and let it heat through before serving. 

luckypeach:

For our All You Can Eat issue, our Southeastern Pennsylvania correspondent Mark Ibold took on the buffets of Amish Country—and brought home this recipe.

Chicken Pot Pie

Makes 4 to 6 servings

Chicken Pot Pie is a staple of Pennsylvanian Dutch cooking and a fixture at Amish Country buffets. What we call chicken pot pie in central PA is more like a thick chicken noodle stew, a relative of what they call chicken and dumplings in Edna Lewis’s part of the country. 

1 chicken, 3 to 4 pounds
2 to 3 Q chicken broth (store-bought is fine)
1 large pinch saffron (like 20 strands)
1 C flour
2 t baking powder
1 t salt (more as needed to season)
1 T butter
1 egg
½ eggshell full of cold water
1 small white onion, halved and thinly sliced
1 largish Russet potato, peeled, halved lengthwise, and thinly sliced
+ fresh ground black pepper

1. Cut up the chicken in pieces, nestle them into a cozy pot, and cover with broth by about an inch. Sprinkle in the saffron, cover with a lid, and bring to a simmer over high heat. Once it has simmered, turn the heat down as low as it’ll go and let the chicken poach for 25 minutes. Then turn the heat off, leave the lid on, and let the pot sit until the chicken is cool enough to handle. 

2. While the chicken is cooling, make the noodles: sift together the flour, baking powder, and salt. Cut in the butter, then work in the eggs and water. As soon as the dough comes together, roll it thin and cut it into 2” by 2” noodles. (I like to make rippled noodles; if you’ve got a wavy-edged rolling cutter, do so.)

3. Move the chicken from the pot to a bowl and bring the broth to a boil over high heat. Add noodles, a handful at a time, stirring well after each addition. The noodles will puff up in a minute or two (and eventually disintegrate to a degree, which is perfectly fine.) Add the onion and potato, stir, and once the broth returns to a boil, reduce the heat to a simmer. Cook until the potatoes are soft and almost breaking up. 

4. While the potatoes are simmering, shred the chicken by hand, and season the meat amply with salt and lots of black pepper. Add it to the pot and let it heat through before serving. 

Thank god it’s Frida

charlissimo:

CHARLY & SHARLIE
LOCATION: HOUSTON & NOLA

  while i was holed up in the studio doing this shitmy little sister sharla wanted to created a few portraits to wheat paste around new orleans. she draws the most precise shit, right. 
  it happened to be memorial day weekend, perfect timing. we painted these with gouache on the sunny porch of a haunted house (but i mean, everything’s haunted). later that eve was my first time making wheat paste glue but i was delicate so it came out kinda perfect. 
   the next day, we cabbed over to the french quarter at 6am and the entire city was ours for hours. we tagged the area with Frida, Bob, Minnie, and of course my band/art collective Chargauxwe rented some bikes later so we could hunt down our dried work, and sharla ended up getting offered a whole show, that’s some shit 

find sharla - brokecurator.tumblr.com

(via defendneworleans)

idk-my-bff-nola:

We Got Dat Fiyah! | Jazz Fest | New Orleans | Sam Ballen

idk-my-bff-nola:

We Got Dat Fiyah! | Jazz Fest | New Orleans | Sam Ballen

Things that seem hard, but aren’t = baked potatoes.

Oven: 350 degrees.
Potato: wash, coat in oil and salt. Poke it a few times for superstition’s sake. Set directly on the oven rack, maybe with a pan beneath it if you remember. Foil? No. 
Time: ~1 hour. You can cut the time down by microwaving them for 5 minutes or so first, if you’re in a hurry.
Toppings: Are you serious? Are you Wendy? Do I have to tell you everything? Butter, chives, sour cream, cheese, bacon, pepper, more salt.

Things that seem hard, but aren’t = baked potatoes.

Oven: 350 degrees.

Potato: wash, coat in oil and salt. Poke it a few times for superstition’s sake. Set directly on the oven rack, maybe with a pan beneath it if you remember. Foil? No. 

Time: ~1 hour. You can cut the time down by microwaving them for 5 minutes or so first, if you’re in a hurry.

Toppings: Are you serious? Are you Wendy? Do I have to tell you everything? Butter, chives, sour cream, cheese, bacon, pepper, more salt.

(Source: boohooray)

(Source: 2day2morrow, via luckypeach)

"So, what’s your story? For whom do you yearn? Could be your parole officer. Or the guy you hired to kill your ex. We generally are attracted to complication: people who it might be impossible to pursue. As the great John Wieners wrote, “The poem does not lie to us. We lie under its law.” I quote that a lot, because it’s the most important thing a poem can do: communicate energy and Capital T Truth to the reader. In this case to someone you think is pretty special. So make your Truth sound pretty good."

How To Write A Love Poem - The Awl

"Granny says, Do not throw the murky rice water away. Store them in a pail and use them to water your plants."

5 Ways To Make Rice Porridge And Congee

I love Asian cooking.